Object Details

Village sign

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General Information
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Author: Anthony McIntosh
Copyright for Photograph:

Creative Commons

Location

Street:Reynolds Lane
Town:Slindon
Parish:Slindon
Council:Arun District Council
County:West Sussex
Postcode:BN18
Location on Google Map
Object setting:Road or Wayside
Access is:Public
Location note:At the Reynolds Lane junction with School Hill and Park Lane
In the AZ book:West Sussex
Page:143
Grid reference:L1
The A-Z books used are A-Z East Sussex and A-Z West Sussex (Editions 1A 2005). Geographers' A-Z Map Company Ltd. Sevenoaks.

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Makers


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General Information

Commissioned by: Slindon Pudding Club
Construction period:2000
Installation date:2000
Work is:Extant
Owner custodian:Slindon Parish Council
Object listing:Not listed
Description:An oak village sign surmounting a low brick base. Comprises an upright square post with a square cross bar on top. On top of the crossbar is a wooden carved cricket bat and ball leaning against a wicket.
Signatures:On the east and western faces of the post and cross bar are carved letters:
SLINDON 2000.
Inscription:Bronze plaque on north face of post with black painted incised letters:

THIS SIGN WAS DONATED BY
THE SLINDON PUDDING CLUB
AND DEPICTS THE SHAPE & SIZE
OF THE BAT AND WICKET
THAT WAS FIRST USED IN
SLINDON IN 1731

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Classification

Categories:Functional, Free Standing, Commemorative, Roadside / Wayside, Sculptural
Object type1:Marker
     Object subtype1:Village sign
Subject type1:Figurative

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Object Parts

Part 1:Post and sign
     Material:Oak
     Height (cm):280
     Width (cm):60
     Depth (cm):28

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Object Condition

Overall condition:Good
Risk assessment:No known risk
Condition 1 of type:Surface
     Condition 1: Corrosion, deterioration
     More details:Black paint of the inscription wearing in places.
Condition 2 of type:Structural
     Condition 1: Cracks, splits, breaks, holes
     More details:Post split badly on eastern side due to weather.
Date of on-site inspection:26/08/2008

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History

History:‘Cricket as an organised game owes much to the Duke of Richmond at Goodwood Park. In the 17th century, he developed a stable of players, largely from his estate workers and local landowners, and including Slindon residents. The Newland brothers, and Richard in particular, were key to the development of the game, with Slindon as its focal point. Apart from being their home, Slindon Common with its clay surface on fast-draining gravel provided a level and fast pitch allowing more accurate play than the usual downland turf. When the Duke was summoned by the King to help suppress the Stuart rebellion in Scotland in the early 1700s, Newland and his fellow players formed their own club.
Slindon, therefore, can unquestionably claim to have the oldest cricket club in continuous existence. Hambledon Club subsequently became renowned, but owes its origin to the Newlands and their nephew Richard Nyren who became the landlord of the Bat & Ball tavern on Broadhalfpenny Down.
Richard Newland was the first great left-handed batsman and bowler whose side took on the best in England, including the famous match in 1740 when an all-England team was beaten by “poore little Slyndon…in almost one innings”. His headstone may still be seen today near the entrance to Slindon’s village church.
The other enduring legacy of those glory days was the first set of rules governing the playing of the game. Largely drawn up by the Duke of Richmond, they became the subject of a formal agreement in 1744 between the Duke and Alan Brodrick, later Viscount Midleton, resident of Surrey. This remains substantially the basis of the code of cricket laws in operation to this day.
Slindon’s cricketing heritage is honoured today both by the memorial of “crick”, wicket and ball at the junction of Reynolds Lane and Park Lane, and by the players who still oil their bats, don their pads and walk to the crease on that flat and true Slindon Common pitch.’
(http://www.slindon.com/)

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References


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Photographs





Author: Anthony McIntosh
Copyright: Creative Commons




Author: Anthony McIntosh
Copyright: Creative Commons




Author: Anthony McIntosh
Copyright: Creative Commons




Author: Anthony McIntosh
Copyright: Creative Commons

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