Object Details

War Memorial

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Makers
General Information
Classification
Object Parts
Object Condition
History
References
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Author: Anthony McIntosh
Copyright for Photograph:

Creative Commons

Location

Street:The Street / Cow Lane
Town:South Harting
Parish:Harting
Council:Chichester District Council
County:West Sussex
Postcode:GU31
Location on Google Map
Object setting:Outside building
and in:Religious
Access is:Public
Location note:Churchyard of the
In the AZ book:West Sussex
Page:78
Grid reference:A4
The A-Z books used are A-Z East Sussex and A-Z West Sussex (Editions 1A 2005). Geographers' A-Z Map Company Ltd. Sevenoaks.
OS Reference:SU783193
Previous location:Church of St. Mary & St. Gabriel

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Makers

Name : Eric Gill
     Role:Sculptor

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General Information

Commissioned by: Rev. A.J. Reeves of South Harting
Construction period:5 August - 20 December 1920
Installation date:1921
Unveiling date:03/07/1921
Work is:Extant
Owner custodian:Church of St. Mary & St. Gabriel
Description:Tall obelisk on low square base with bas-relief carvings around the lower sides mounted on low base. the carvings depict to the south east, St. George, north east, St. Patrick, north west, St. Andrew, south west, St. David. Holds 35 names of those from South Harting who died in WWI.
Inscription:Carved letters, north east face, above carving of St. Patrick:

AND THUS
THEY DIED
LEAVING
THEIR DE-
ATHS FOR
AN EXAMPLE
OF A NOBLE
COURAGE
AND
A MEMORIAL
OF VIRTUE
NOT ONLY
UNTO YOUNG
MEN BUT
UNTO ALL
THEIR
NATION
II MACC.VI.3I

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Classification

Categories:Military, Free Standing, Commemorative, Religious, Sculptural
Object type1:War memorial
     Object subtype1:World War I
Object type2:Sculpture
Object type3:Shaft
     Object subtype1:Obelisk
Subject type1:Figurative
Subject type2:Pictorial
     Subject subtype1:Group

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Object Parts

Part 1:Obelisk
     Material:Portland stone
     Height (cm):533
     Width (cm):53
     Depth (cm):53
Part 2:Base of obelisk
     Material:Portland stone
     Height (cm):62
     Width (cm):120
     Depth (cm):120
Part 3:Base
     Material:Portland stone
     Height (cm):20
     Width (cm):370
     Depth (cm):370

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Object Condition

Overall condition:Good
Risk assessment:No known risk
Condition 1 of type:Structural
     Condition 1: Cracks, splits, breaks, holes
     More details:Cracks all over the base.
Date of on-site inspection:02/04/2008

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History

History:‘This is Job 708 in Gill’s ledgers and it was a commission in March 1919 from the Rev. A.J. Reeves of South Harting. Gill, along with Desmond Chute, made drawings for this memorial in March, July and August 1919 and then he did not return to it again until 11 June 1920, when he made a half-inch scale drawing of the cross for faculty purposes. Four days later he began to get the stone ready for carving. On 4 August he drew out the composition of the design onto the stone and began carving the following day. On 8 September his assistant Hilary Stratton began cutting away the backgrounds of the saints. On 14 September Gill visited South Harting to discuss the setting of the base and he also met the parish committee to discuss the cross in general. He worked on the reliefs of the four saints – Andrew, Patrick, George and David – during October, November and December. The four saints represent the patron saints of Scotland, Ireland, England and Wales. Gill worked on the monument for a total of thirty-four days, and the total cost of it was £450. The cross was dedicated on 3 July 1921 by the Venerable Archdeacon of Chichester.’
(Eric Gill: The Sculpture, A Catalogue Raisonne')

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References

Source 1 :
     Title:'Eric Gill: The Sculpture, A Catalogue Raisonne'
     Type:Book
     Author:Collins, Judith
     Page:115
     Publisher:Herbert Press. London.


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Photographs





Author: Anthony McIntosh
Copyright: Creative Commons




Author: Anthony McIntosh
Copyright: Creative Commons




Author: Anthony McIntosh
Copyright: Creative Commons




Author: Anthony McIntosh
Copyright: Creative Commons

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