Object Details

John Wesley Woodward - Titanic Memorial

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General Information
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Author: Anthony McIntosh
Copyright for Photograph:

Creative Commons

Location

Street:Grand Parade
Town:Eastbourne
Parish:Eastbourne
Council:Eastbourne Borough Council
County:East Sussex
Postcode:BN21
Location on Google Map
Object setting:On building
Access is:Public
Location note:Lower Parade underneath the columns in the bandstand arena
In the AZ book:East Sussex
Page:161
Grid reference:M7
The A-Z books used are A-Z East Sussex and A-Z West Sussex (Editions 1A 2005). Geographers' A-Z Map Company Ltd. Sevenoaks.
OS Reference:TQ615985

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Makers

Name : Charles Godfrey Garrard
     Role:Sculptor

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General Information

Commissioned by: Arthur Beckett, newspaper publisher, Chairman, Woodward Memorial Committee
Installation date:1914
Unveiling date:24/10/1914
Work is:Extant
Owner custodian:Eastbourne Borough Council
Object listing:Grade II: of special interest warranting every effort to preserve them
Listing date:22/10/1998
Description:A rectangular granite memorial affixed to the wall underneath columns facing the bandstand. In the centre of the memorial is a bronze portrait medallion of Woodward, with a bronze relief of a violin underneath. To the left is a rectangular bronze inscribed plaque and to the right of the medallion, a relief plaque in bronze depicting the sinking ship and lifeboats.
Inscription:Left hand panel:

THIS TABLET IS ERECTED AS
A TRIBUTE TO THE SELF
SACRIFICE AND DEVOTION OF
JOHN WESLEY WOODWARD
(FORMERLY A MEMBER OF
THE EASTBOURNE MUNICIPAL
ORCHESTRA
THE DUKE OF DEVONSHIRE’S
ORCHESTRA
AND THE GRAND HOTEL EASTBOURNE
ORCHESTRA,
WHO WITH OTHERS OF THE
HERO-MUSICIANS OF THE
SHIP’S BAND PERISHED IN
THE ATLANTIC THROUGH THE
SINKING OF THE WHITE STAR
LINER “TITANIC”
ON APRIL 15TH 1912.

“FAITHFUL UNTO DEATH”

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Classification

Categories:Commemorative, Sculptural
Object type1:Sculpture
Object type2:Relief
Subject type1:Pictorial
     Subject subtype1:Group
Subject type2:Portrait
     Subject subtype1:Head

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Object Parts

Part 1:Whole memorial
     Material:Pink / grey granite
     Height (cm):76
     Width (cm):145
     Depth (cm):9
Part 2:Panels
     Material:Bronze
     Height (cm):50
     Width (cm):34
     Depth (cm):2.5

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Object Condition

Overall condition:Good
Risk assessment:No known risk
Condition 1 of type:Structural
     Condition 1: Broken or missing parts
     More details:A piece of the bronze scroll work above the violin is missing.
Condition 2 of type:Surface
     Condition 1: Metallic staining
     More details:There is metallic staining on the granite underneath the plaques. At some point it appears that the bronze has been varnished and this is now discolouring.
Date of on-site inspection:28/04/2007

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History

History:‘The Titanic Disaster'
While the horror of the Titanic disaster is still fresh in the public mind, and the nation is contributing with an almost unexampled generosity to funds for the survivors and the families of the crew, would it not be as well to give a little thought to those who did not survive? This question finds some response in the feeling which has been expressed in several quarters that a memorials should be erected in Eastbourne to Mr. J. Wesley Woodward, a member of that heroic orchestra, who went down with the ship.
Such would be a fitting tribute to a gallant Eastbourne musician, and at the same time perpetuate the memory of the many other heroic deeds performed by the other brave men who perished on that occasion.
It may be mentioned here that the Belgians are already commencing a memorial in honour of the Belgian member of the Titanic's orchestra; and there Belgians set such an example it would be some reproach for Englishmen not to follow it.
A memorial to Mr. Wesley Woodward, who was so well known and so deservedly popular for so long a time in the town, would, we feel sure, be welcomed by all residents, musical and non-musical alike, to whom heroism and devotion to duty appeal as qualities deserving of honour.
The memorial should preferably be placed either on the Sea front or in the vicinity of the Devonshire Park; and the sculpture should be of a graceful and artistic character, symbolical of music, and above all, with no funeral features about it.
The cost of erection ought not to prove prohibitive, and the sum necessary should be subscribed without difficulty. The many musicians of reputation and ability in the town would not, we think, hesitate to come forward in support of any such scheme; and once the subscription is opened others would, unless we are greatly mistaken, extend a ready support also.
Nearly a quarter of a million pounds have already been subscribed to the Titanic fund. Without wishing to cast any reflections on the praiseworthy objects of the fund, we may be allowed to comment on a certain disproportion which naturally occurs to the practical mind between the amount and the number of widows of the crew who are mainly to benefit by it.
When one considers also that the legal compensation in each case will be (it is stated) an additionally £300 for each person, one cannot help thinking that these destitute widows will not after all fare so badly.
From a financial and not a sentimental point of view their position will probably be better now than before. Surely then a very small percentage of these collected sums might worthily be devoted to the erection of some fitting memorials to those who perished nobly with the vessel and left no destitute relations behind them? (Eastbourne Gazette, Wednesday 1 May 1912)

Mr John Wesley Woodward, 32 when he died, was born in West Bromwich, Staffordshire on 11 September 1879. He was the youngest son of Joseph and Martha E. Woodward.
John Wesley Woodward became well known as a cello player appearing in solo and a member of several string quartetes. He left Oxford to join the Duke of Devonshire's band at Eastbourne but that enterprise fell through around 1909 so he joined the White Star Line, his first voyage being to Jamaica. He made a number of journeys across the Atlantic, and three across the Mediterranean. He was on board the Olympic when she collided with H.M.S. Hawke, and narrowly escaped injury as he was in the cabin with three colleagues just where the Hawke struck. Woodward had taken his best cello with him for the first time for the Titanic 's maiden voyage and on his return was due to perform at the May dinner of Magdalen College, Oxford. Woodward and all the other musicians died in the sinking.
(Encyclopaedia Titanica website)


The plaque was unveiled by the opera singer, Clara Butt
Hard archive file:Yes

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References

Source 1 :
     Title:Eastbourne Gazette
     Type:Newspaper
     Date:01/05/1912


Further information:
http://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/titanic-biography/john-wesley-woodward.html
http://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/mr-j-wesley-woodward.html

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Photographs





Date: 28/04/2007
Author: Anthony McIntosh
Copyright: Creative Commons




Date: 28/04/2007
Author: Anthony McIntosh
Copyright: Creative Commons




Date: 28/04/2007
Author: Anthony McIntosh
Copyright: Creative Commons




Date: 28/04/2007
Author: Anthony McIntosh
Copyright: Creative Commons

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