Object Details

St. James' Obelisk

Browse information by:
Location
Makers
General Information
Classification
Object Parts
Object Condition
History
References
Photographs

Download this information in PDF

See 3D model



Author: Anthony McIntosh
Copyright for Photograph:

Creative Commons

Location

Street:Westhampnett Road
Town:Chichester
Parish:Chichester
Council:Chichester District Council
County:West Sussex
Postcode:PO19
Location on Google Map
Object setting:Road or Wayside
Access is:Public
Location note:On the roundabout at the junction with St. Pancras
In the AZ book:West Sussex
Page:140
Grid reference:F5
The A-Z books used are A-Z East Sussex and A-Z West Sussex (Editions 1A 2005). Geographers' A-Z Map Company Ltd. Sevenoaks.

back to top

Makers


back to top

General Information

Construction period:1735
Installation date:1735
Work is:Extant
Owner custodian:Chichester City Council
Object listing:Grade II: of special interest warranting every effort to preserve them
Description:A stone obelisk made in 1735 to mark the then North-East boundary of the City. It also bears the date 1839. Faces north west.
Inscription:Inscription to north west base:

ERECTED IN THE
MAYORALTY OF
CHARLES DUKE
OF RICHMOND
LENNOX & AUBIGNY
MDCCXLV

Inscription on SE face of base illegible

back to top

Classification

Categories:Roadside / Wayside, Commemorative
Object type1:Shaft
     Object subtype1:Obelisk
Subject type1:Non-figurative

back to top

Object Parts

Part 1:Obelisk
     Material:Stone
     Height (cm):185
     Width (cm):34
     Depth (cm):34
Part 2:Base
     Material:Stone
     Height (cm):100
     Width (cm):57
     Depth (cm):57

back to top

Object Condition

Overall condition:Fair
Risk assessment:At risk
Condition 1 of type:Surface
     Condition 1: Corrosion, deterioration
     Condition 2: Biological growth
     Condition 3: Previous treatments
     More details:Biological growth. Severe weather wearing on all sides. Evidence of previous repairs to cracks. Inscription on SE face of base illegible.
Condition 2 of type:Structural
     Condition 1: Broken or missing parts
     Condition 2: Cracks, splits, breaks, holes
     More details:Evidence of two previous complete breaks of the obelisk. Chunk of the stone missing at N.W. base of obelisk – appears to be quite old damage.
Condition 3 of type:Vandalism
     Condition 1: Graffiti
     More details:Green and red paint splashed on the north west face of the obelisk.
Date of on-site inspection:11/12/2007

back to top

History

History:The Dukedom was first created (as Duke of Richmond and Somerset) for Henry Fitzroy, the illegitimate son of Henry VIII Tudor by Elizabeth Blount. Upon his death without children in 1536 it became extinct.
Ludovic Stuart, second Duke of Lennox (see Lennox (district)) (1574-1624), who also held other titles in the peerage of Scotland, was created Earl of Richmond in 1613 and Duke of Richmond in 1623 as a member of the Lennox line (not unlike King James himself) in the House of Stuart. These became extinct at his death in 1624, but his Scottish honors devolved on his brother Esmé, Earl of March. Esmé's son James, the fourth Duke of Lennox (1612-1655), was created Duke of Richmond in 1641, the two dukedoms again becoming united. In 1672, on the death of James' nephew Charles, 3rd Duke of Richmond and 6th Duke of Lennox, both titles again became extinct.
The third creation was in August 1675, when Charles II granted the title to Charles Lennox, his illegitimate son by Louise de Keroualle, Duchess of Portsmouth. Charles Lennox was further created Duke of Lennox a month later. Charles' son, also Charles, succeeded to the French title Duke of Aubigny (of Aubigny-sur-Nère) on the death of his grandmother in 1734.
The 6th Duke of Richmond and Lennox was created Duke of Gordon (See Clan Gordon) in 1876. Thus, the Duke holds three (four, if the Aubigny claim is accepted) dukedoms, more than any other person in the realm. The Dukes of Richmond, Lennox and Gordon are normally styled Duke of Richmond and Gordon. Before the creation of the Dukedom of Gordon they were styled Duke of Richmond and Lennox.
The subsidiary titles are: Earl of March (created 1675), Earl of Darnley (1675), Earl of Kinrara (1876), Baron Settrington, of Settrington in the County of York (1675), and Baron Torbolton (1675). The titles Earl of March and Baron Settrington were created in the peerage of England along with the Dukedom of Richmond. The titles Earl of Darnley and Baron Torbolton were created in the Peerage of Scotland along with the Dukedom of Lennox. Finally, the title Earl of Kinrara was created in the peerage of the United Kingdom with the Dukedom of Gordon. The eldest son of the Duke uses the courtesy title Earl of March and Kinrara. Before the creation of the Dukedom of Gordon, the courtesy title used was Earl of March.
The family seat is Goodwood House near Chichester, West Sussex.
(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duke_of_Richmond 14/12/2007)

‘The obelisk was presented to the city by the 2nd. Duke of Richmond to mark his serving as Mayor in 1735. It was overturned by vandals soon after following a rumour that a gold sovereign had been placed under it.’
(Chichester; An Illustrated History’, p67)

back to top

References

Source 1 :
     Title:‘Chichester; An Illustrated History’
     Type:Book
     Author:Green, Ken.
     Publisher:Bredon Books Ltd. Derby.


back to top

Photographs





Author: Anthony McIntosh
Copyright: Creative Commons




Author: Anthony McIntosh
Copyright: Creative Commons




Author: Anthony McIntosh
Copyright: Creative Commons

back to top