Object Details

Terracotta Reliefs

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General Information
Classification
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Location

Street:Grand Parade
Town:Brighton
Parish:Brighton
Council:Brighton & Hove City Council
County:East Sussex
Postcode:BN2
Location on Google Map
Object setting:Inside building
Access is:Public
Location note:Inside the south entrance foyer of the University of Brighton
In the AZ book:East Sussex
Page:162
Grid reference:F8
The A-Z books used are A-Z East Sussex and A-Z West Sussex (Editions 1A 2005). Geographers' A-Z Map Company Ltd. Sevenoaks.
Previous location:External wall of the Brighton New School of Science and Art

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Makers

Name : Alexander Fisher
     Role:Designer
Company/Group :Messrs. Johnson, Ditchling Potteries
     Role:Ceramicist
Company/Group :J.G. Gibbins of Brighton
     Role:Architect

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General Information

Commissioned by: Public subscription
Construction period:1876-1877
Unveiling date:03/02/1877
Work is:Extant
Owner custodian:University of Brighton
Object listing:Not listed
Description:The panel that was on the northern wing representing the arts, figures including: pottery represented by a boy carrying an earthenware vessel; architecture by another constructing a toy house; sculpture by a sculptor at work on a bust; geometry by a fourth figure with compasses examining a scroll; building construction by a youth with a saw and plank; painting by an artist at his easel. The panel that was on the southern wing: figures illustrating the sciences including: astronomy, electricity, navigation, microscopy, geology, botany, agriculture, entomology.

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Classification

Categories:Sculptural, Architectural
Object type1:Relief
Object type2:Sculpture
Object type3:Panel
Subject type1:Pictorial
     Subject subtype1:Group
Subject type2:Figurative
Subject type3:Symbolic

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Object Parts


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Object Condition

Overall condition:Good
Risk assessment:No known risk

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History

History:The Brighton New School of Science and Art was opened on 2 February 1877 by H.R.H. Princess Louise, accompanied by her husband, the Marquis of Lorne. Brighton had had a School of Art since 1858, originally set in the Royal Pavilion. The funds to build the new school were raised by public subscription fund begun by Alderman Ireland in 1873. The Government contributed £1000 to the cost. Captain Hill advanced initial funds and also contributed a stained glass window for the main staircase. A site was found on Grand Parade at the corner of Carlton Hill and it was decided to combine the School of Art with a School of Science. J.G. Gibbins of Brighton was the architect and G.R. Lockyer of Brighton, the builders. The foundation stone was laid by Sir Henry Cole, K.C.B. in June 1876.
The panel that was on the northern wing representing the arts, figures including: pottery represented by a boy carrying an earthenware vessel; architecture by another constructing a toy house; sculpture by a sculptor at work on a bust; geometry by a fourth figure with compasses examining a scroll; building construction by a youth with a saw and plank; painting by an artist at his easel.
The panel that was on the southern wing: figures illustrating the sciences including: astronomy, electricity, navigation, microscopy, geology, botany, agriculture, entomology.
The designs for the panels were created by the headmaster of the school, Alexander Fisher. A clock for the front of the building, placed above the central panel, was presented by Mr. Boxell of the Kings Road, Brighton.
Princess Louise and her consort arrived at Brighton station in the Royal Train at 12.40 and were met by a large crowd of local dignitaries. The station was heavily decorated for the arrival. The 1st. Sussex Artillery Volunteers formed a 100 strong Guard of Honour and the Band of the Artillery. The 20th Hussars formed a guard at the exit of the station. The streets on the Royal route to the Art School were densely lined with cheering, enthusiastic people, many of the surrounding streets becoming impassable causing problems for both Brighton and Hove Police Forces who had been drafted in for the visit. The streets had been heavily festooned with banners and hoardings and a triple arc de triomphe had been erected at the junction of Gloucester Road and Queens Road. The arch depicted the Royal Standard, the Order of the Garter and bore the text: “Welcome to the lovers of Science and Art”. In North Street, ‘Venetian Masts’ were placed closely together and were densely hung with flags, heraldic designs and coloured banners. Residents all along the route had decorated the outsides of their houses. ‘One incident of the route was much noticed. As the Royal carriage passed under a scroll with the words, “Thrice welcome, true daughter of Albert the Good”, the Princess bowed to it and , directing her husband’s attention to it, he raised his hat”.
On arriving at the school, the Princess was shown around the new building by Frederick Merrifield, the Chairman of the Building Committee. The School had been decorated by the current students. The Royal Party also made visits to the Museum and Art Gallery, meeting T.W. Wonfor, the Curator of the Museum and Captain Henry Hill, the Chairman of the Fine Arts Committee. The Dome was the setting for the inauguration ceremony of the New School. It was filled with the ‘elite’ of Brighton. The stage was set aside for the Royal Party and local dignitaries. The large orchestra played a large selection of music. The Mayor opened proceedings, followed by Princess Louise announcing the New School as open. A speech followed by the Marquis of Lorne who talked about the benefits to society of both Art and Science, saying ‘These schools were not instituted in order that solid work might give way to prettiness; but that that solid work shall be clothed with beauty’. Several other speeches followed and votes of thanks to the Princess, the Mayor and other Borough officials. As the party left for the luncheon in the Banqueting Room at the Royal Pavilion, the orchestra played ‘Auld Lang Syne’. The luncheon was for 128 guests. After the luncheon, the party visited Brighton High School and then the Aquarium. Again, the streets were packed with people and the Rifle Band played outside the entrance. After the Aquarium visit the party left for the station departing Brighton at 4.50pm. That evening the Mayor gave a ‘Soiree’ at the Dome and Corn Exchange, issuing between 1200 and 1500 invitations. Microscopes and other scientific instruments were on exhibition in the Corn Exchange and the Art Gallery was opened.
One sad incident occurred at the top of North Street after the departure of the Royal Party. Throngs of people throughout the evening filled the streets looking at the decorations. About 7.30pm, a large terracotta urn, weighing about three hundredweight, dislodged from the roof of the White Lion Hotel, possibly having been caught by a flag. Elizabeth Brown and her four month old child were struck by the urn and died.
Others were injured when about 25 feet of railings gave way in Queens Road.
(Brighton Herald. 3 February 1877.)

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References

Source 1 :
     Title:'From Art School to Polytechnic: Serving Industry and the Community From Brighton'
     Type:Book
     Author:Woodham, Jonathan M., & Worden, Suzette.
     Page:7-13
     Publisher:Faculty of Art & Design, Brighton Polytechnic.


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Photographs


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