Object Details

Maharaja of Cooch Behar Memorial Drinking Fountain

Browse information by:
Location
Makers
General Information
Classification
Object Parts
Object Condition
History
References
Photographs

Download this information in PDF

See 3D model



Copyright for Photograph:

Bexhill Museum

Location

Street:Egerton Road
Town:Bexhill on Sea
Parish:Bexhill on Sea
Council:Rother District Council
County:East Sussex
Postcode:TN40
Location on Google Map
Object setting:Public Park
Access is:Public
Location note:Egerton Park (moved there in 1934)
In the AZ book:East Sussex
Page:145
Grid reference:J2
The A-Z books used are A-Z East Sussex and A-Z West Sussex (Editions 1A 2005). Geographers' A-Z Map Company Ltd. Sevenoaks.
Previous location:On the present site of the De La Warr Pavilion.

back to top

Makers

Company/Group :Royal Doulton
     Role:Ceramicist

back to top

General Information

Unveiling date:18/09/1913
Work is:Lost
Object listing:Not listed
Description:A square 'tower-like' structure set upon a raised square base. On the lower section, there is an arched drinking fountain on all four sides. Above one of these is a carved inscription and coat of arms. This is surmounted by a moulding with carved reliefs at the four corners. On top of this sits a stone urn on a pedestal.

back to top

Classification

Categories:Free Standing, Commemorative, Functional
Object type1:Fountain
     Object subtype1:Drinking Fountain
Subject type1:Non-figurative

back to top

Object Parts


back to top

Object Condition


back to top

History

History:The funeral of the Maharaja took place in Bexhill on 21 September 1911. The Maharajah had come to Bexhill to convalesce after leaving Moor Hall, Ninfield. His daughter had recently drowned. The drinking fountain was opened by his second son, Maharaja Kumar Jitendra. The drinking fountain stood on the present site of the De La Warr Pavilion, was moved to Egerton Park in 1934 and was demolished in 1963.

‘The erection in England of a memorial to the Ruler of an Indian State must be an incident of a unique character, and those who were privileged to witness the ceremonial opening of the Maharajah of Cooch Behar fountain at Bexhill on Thursday afternoon were spectators of an event of rare occurrence and world-wide interest.
The proceedings were admirably arranged and though brief in duration, they could hardly have been of a more suitable character. The Mayor, who is always seen at his best on such occasions, had the able support of the Mayoress, while the Town Clerk had spared no effort to render the ceremony agreeable to the distinguished visitors who were honouring the town with their presence.
The young Maharajah, who has been suddenly called to the rulership of the State of Cooch Behar on the lamented death of his brother, made an excellent impression. Wearing a turban and a handsome native dress, he presented a striking figure. His speech was admirably delivered. Speaking clearly but rather rapidly, his voice was plainly heard by the several thousands of people gathered round, and the reference to his late father and the town of Bexhill could not have been more felicitously expressed.
On the part of the public the greatest interest was evinced in the young Maharanee, whose marriage a few weeks ago under somewhat romantic circumstances excited so much attention. Her Highness was in European dress, her costume being black, and the members of the numerous suite were also in mourning for the late Maharajah. Smaller in stature than her husband, the Maharanee bore herself with charming modesty, and was obviously pleased with the beautiful bouquet presented her by the Mayoress. As a daughter of the powerful and wealthy Indian Prince, the Gaekwar of Baroda, her Highness was educated in England, and is therefore thoroughly conversant with Western manners and customs.’
(Bexhill on Sea Observer. 20 September 1913.)

The fountain originally stood to the side of the Coastguards Cottages on the present site of the De La Warr Pavilion. When the cottages were demolished in 1934 to make way for the Pavilion, the fountain was re-erected in Egerton Park. It stood near to the park entrance next to the Bexhill Museum until 1963 when it was removed for restoration. It was stored in Bexhill Cemetery for a while but then subsequently disappeared. Its current wherabouts is unknown.

back to top

References

Source 1 :
     Title:Bexhill-On-Sea Observer
     Type:Newspaper
     Page:9
     Publisher:Bexhill-On-Sea Observer

Source 2 :
     Title:'Images of England: Bexhill on Sea'
     Type:Book
     Author:Porter, Julian.
     Page:47 & 74
     Publisher:Tempus Publishing Ltd. Stroud.

Source 3 :
     Title:'Bexhill on Sea in Old Photographs'
     Type:Book
     Author:Green, Helen & Pinney, Avia.
     Page:117
     Publisher:Alan Sutton Publishing Ltd. Stroud.


back to top

Photographs





Copyright: Bexhill Museum

back to top