Object Details

National Cycle Network Route Marker

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Makers
General Information
Classification
Object Parts
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History
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Author: Anthony McIntosh
Copyright for Photograph:

Creative Commons

Location

Street:Promenade
Town:Eastbourne
Parish:Eastbourne
Council:Eastbourne Borough Council
County:East Sussex
Postcode:BN22
Location on Google Map
Object setting:Road or Wayside
Access is:Public
Location note:Directly to the back of the Sovereign Centre
In the AZ book:East Sussex
Page:155
Grid reference:H6
The A-Z books used are A-Z East Sussex and A-Z West Sussex (Editions 1A 2005). Geographers' A-Z Map Company Ltd. Sevenoaks.

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Makers

Name : Andrew Rowe
     Role:Designer

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General Information

Commissioned by: Sustrans and the Royal Bank of Scotland
Commissioned also by: The Millennium Commission
Construction period:1998
Work is:Extant
Owner custodian:Eastbourne Borough Council
Object listing:Not listed
Description:Blue painted chain on a black background. Flags at the top in metal that have mileage indicators on. Raised letters, painted silver. The design is based upon the nautical and industrial heritage of his native Swansea and can have up to four directional fingers.

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Classification

Categories:Roadside / Wayside, Functional, Free Standing, Sculptural
Object type1:Marker
     Object subtype1:Milepost
Subject type1:Figurative

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Object Parts

Part 1:Marker
     Material:Cast iron
     Height (cm):175
     Width (cm):85
     Depth (cm):6

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Object Condition

Overall condition:Good
Risk assessment:No known risk
Condition 1 of type:Surface
     Condition 1: Corrosion, deterioration
     More details:Some weather wearing to painted surface.
Date of on-site inspection:07/07/2007

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History

History:'The Millennium Time Trail
The Time Trail is a four-dimensional voyage and puzzle around the National Cycle Network. Throughout the UK there are almost one thousand cast iron mileposts on National Cycle Network routes, many of which carry embossed metal discs the size of small plates. Each disc contains a design that can be copied by making a pencil and paper rubbing to help you record your journey. There are over 60 different designs repeated around the Network divided into five sets. Each set of designs joins up like a three dimensional sculptural jigsaw to illustrate different aspects of Time. The five sets lead to a very rare 6th set - a final mystery to be solved and Treasure to be discovered. There are at least two copies of most Time Trail Symbols in each region and the mileposts have been arranged so that the first two sets of designs can often be collected during a single ride near a large town.
Throughout the Time Trail you will find a number of themes. The ancient elements of Fire, Earth, Air and Water and the Ether are intertwined in the designs, whilst the seasons, the zodiac and the history of the last twenty centuries are the common threads that connect the Time Trail images together. Ingredients of ancient philosophy, time and space, astronomy, alchemy and molten metal are thrown together into the melting pot and stirred by the users of the National Cycle Network in their quest to solve some of the mysteries of Time.
How far the Time Trail will lead will vary from child to child and from adult to adult. Not everyone will manage to or expect to go the whole distance in the quest, for Time means different things to different people. But one thing is guaranteed - we are all on a voyage in Time and Space in our lifetimes and the Time Trail hopes to reflect this and capture the excitement and essence of that voyage for those who get out there and use the National Cycle Network.'
('The Millennium Time Trail: Information'. Sustrans)

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References


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Photographs





Author: Anthony McIntosh
Copyright: Creative Commons




Author: Anthony McIntosh
Copyright: Creative Commons




Author: Anthony McIntosh
Copyright: Creative Commons




Author: Anthony McIntosh
Copyright: Creative Commons

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